Relational Coordination Research Collaborative

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RC Research Webinars

RCRC Research Webinars are held monthly throughout the academic year.  Each webinar features a partner who is at the early, middle, late or completed stage of his or her research.  All RCRC partners are invited to attend to ask questions, provide feedback and gain insight into their own research. Each webinar will have an invited discussant, with RCRC Director Jody Hoffer Gittell serving as the facilitator.

Webinars are held for 90 minutes via Zoom, with check in and greetings led by Professor Gittell.

If you are not already a partner and wish to be, we invite you to sign up now.  All RCRC partners will receive invitations to connect by Zoom and will have access to recordings of past webinars. To view the recordings click on the link below or the title of the webinar that you wish to view and enter your email address and password.  

Current Webinar Schedule

Past Webinars 

Recordings of Past Webinars (Available to RCRC Partners)



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Stay tuned for the webinar schedule for the Fall semester!

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Past Research Webinars

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Spring 2017 Research Webinars (completed)

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Thursday, January 19 (10:00-11:30 ET)

Improving Interdisciplinary Teamwork in Surgical Care through a Relational Coordination Change Initiative (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Caroline Logan (Associate, Abt Associates)

Facilitator: Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Kent Haythorn (Vice President, Surgical Services at Emory Healthcare)

The healthcare industry is moving toward payment mechanisms that require delivery systems to take on greater accountability for patient outcomes. Success in this new environment will require organizations to focus more acutely on how care is coordinated across broad interdisciplinary work processes. Research in healthcare suggests successful teamwork supports improved outcomes for patients, workers and organizations. This webinar presents findings about an effort at Billings Clinic in Montana to improve interdisciplinary teamwork in response to a bundled payment contract, informed by relational coordination theory and metrics.

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Thursday, February 9th (10:00-11:30 ET) 

Relational Self-Affirmation: Changing the Stories We Tell Ourselves (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Julia Lee (Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Michigan)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Amy Wrzesniewski (Professor, Yale University)

Abstract: Working in teams often leads to productivity loss because the need to feel accepted prevents individual members from making a unique contribution to the team in terms of the information or perspective they can offer. Drawing on self-affirmation theory, we propose that pre-team relational self-affirmation can prepare individuals to contribute to team creative performance more effectively. We theorize that relationally-affirming one’s self-views increases general feelings of being socially valued by others, leading to better information exchange and creative performance. In a first study, we found that teams in which members affirmed their best selves prior to team formation (i.e., by soliciting and receiving narratives that highlight one’s positive impact on close others) outperformed teams that did not do so on a creative problem-solving task. In the second experiment, conducted using virtual teams, we show that pre-team relational self-affirmation leads to heightened feelings of social worth, which in turn explains the effect of the treatment on the team’s ability to exchange information.

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Thursday, March 23rd (10:00 -11:30 ET)

Relational Coordination Meets Social Construction - A Conversation (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenters: Jody Hoffer Gittell (RCRC) and Sheila McNamee (The Taos Institute) 

Facilitator:  Tony Suchman (Relationship Centered Healthcare)

In this webinar, Sheila McNamee and Jody Hoffer Gittell will converse about relational coordination and social construction. What are the common threads, where are the areas of difference, and how can the two approaches complement each other in the realms of theory, research and practice?  

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Thursday, April 20th (10:00-11:30 ET)

Improving the Interdisciplinary Team Work in the Operating Room:  Using Relational Coordination as a Framework and Model for Organizational Change (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Birgitte Torring (PhD candidate, Aalborg University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Tim Vogus (Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University)

Abstract: In surgical teams, where health professionals are highly interdependent and work under time pressure, it is of particular importance that the teamwork is well-functioning to secure treatment quality and patient safety. Using the theory of relational coordination (RC) may be the key to unlocking the black box of teamwork in search for relational elements critical to successful collaboration and communication. Few single studies exist which explore how RC could be observed and improved in this context. The present study examines surgical teams in selected operating rooms (OR) focusing on RC with the purpose of identifying different ways of communicating and managing relationships in contexts of variable complexity and developing an intervention program.

An ethnographic field study where data are collected through participant observations (35 teams) and semi-structured interviews (15), over a 10-months period in 2014 in two orthopedic surgical wards in a university hospital in Denmark. A directed content analysis on the basis of theory of RC is used to transform the data to show different typologies of interdisciplinary team work. RC was subsequently measured using the RC Survey.

Data describes very complex conditions for team work in the OR. Four typologies of interdisciplinary team work are identified. The teams have a varying degree of relationship and coordination based on shared goals and different characteristics of communication are identified. Based on these findings and the results from the measurement of RC an intervention program was developed. Implementation of the intervention program may facilitate improvement of positive and efficient relationship in the surgical teams in the OR, thereby enhancing treatment quality and patient safety.

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Thursday, May 25th at 8:00 ET

Performance Management in Context: Formative Cross-Functional Performance Monitoring for Improvement and the Mediating Role of Relational Coordination in Hospitals (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenters: Edel Conway (DCU Business School) and Aoife McDermott (Cardiff Business School) 

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Martin Connor (Gold Coast Health)

Aoife M. McDermott (Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University,UK), Edel Conway (DCU Business School, Dublin City University, Ireland), Kenny Cafferkey (Graduate School of Business, Universiti Tun, Abdul Razak, Malaysia), Janine Bosak & Patrick C. Flood (DCU Business School, Dublin City University, Ireland)

Abstract: Recent research suggests that to fully realise its potential, performance management should be bespoke to the social context in which it operates. Here we analyse factors supporting the use of performance data for improvement. The study purposively examines a developmentally oriented performance management system with cross-functional goals. We suggest that these system characteristics are significant in interdependent work contexts, such as healthcare. We propose and test that (a) relational coordination helps employees work effectively to resolve issues identified through formative and cross-functional performance monitoring and (b) that this contributes to better outcomes for both employees and patients. Based on survey data from management and employee representatives across Irish acute hospitals, the study found that perceptions of relational coordination mediated the link between formative cross-functional performance monitoring and employee outcomes and partially mediated the link between formative cross-functional performance monitoring and patient care respectively. Importantly, the findings relate to a formative cross-functional performance monitoring system, and we note that we have no expectation of their holding in systems with evaluative or more siloed orientations. The study signals potential for a more contextually driven and interdependent approach to the alignment of management and human resource management practices. While relational coordination is important in healthcare, we also note potential to identify other social drivers supporting productive responses to performance monitoring in different contexts. 

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Fall 2016 Research Webinars (completed)

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Friday, September 16 (10:00-11:30 ET)

Leveraging Shared Governance through Evidence Based Practice Councils: The Role of Reciprocal Learning and Relational Coordination (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Changing the operating system of an organization is an arduous task. When there are multiple professionals, there are multiple perspectives. This diversity often includes 
power differentials. Distribution of power at the point of care allows self-organization and is expected to 
strengthen learning and coordination. Governance is no 
longer the function of a single individual, profession, or hierarchical function, but rather is shared by those doing the work. Evidence based practice councils designed as collaborative 
networks have the potential to foster 
shared governance. 


In this project at Hospital of Valais, I measured organizational readiness for shared governance, implemented a learning session 
to improve capacity for shared governance, created evidence based councils as a form of shared governance, and measured the impact of evidence based councils on reciprocal learning and relational coordination. 
I used a pre- post, quasi-experimental evaluation design. Organizational readiness for 
shared governance was measured via the Index of Professional Governance with an 80% (n=129) response rate.  Paired t- tests were used to assess for post-implementation change on reciprocal learning and relational coordination, 
including the Reciprocal Learning Scale and the Relational Coordination Scale (N=32). 

The results (mean 193.14; SD 40.40) ranked perceived nursing governance at the early stage.
 The overall quality of connections in the evidence based council improved after the learning session. We found a statistically 
significant increase in the reciprocal learning (t= -2.452; p= .027).  There 
was a trend towards significant increases in relational coordination as well (t= -1.975; p= 
.068), with relational coordination shifting from weak ties to moderate ties.

Note:  This research was conducted as part of a dissertaton at Duke University School of Nursing.

Presenter: Mario Desmedt (Chief Executive Nurse Officer, Hospital of Valais)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Charles Heckscher (Professor, Rutgers University)

Charles Heckscher is a Professor at Rutgers University and co-Director of the Center for the Study of Collaboration. His research interests include societal trust, organization change, and the changing nature of employee representation. He has also worked as a practitioner and consultant on processes of organizational development, primarily in the telecommunications industry. Before coming to Rutgers he worked for the Communications Workers’ union and taught Human Resources Management at the Harvard Business School; he has also taught at the Wharton School, Sciences-Po, and elsewhere. His books include The New Unionism, White-Collar Blues, Agents of Change, The Collaborative Enterprise, and Trust in a Complex World.

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Friday, October 14 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Public Schools and Immigrant Families Partnering for Student Success (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Cady Landa (PhD Student, Brandeis University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Anne Douglass (Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Boston)

This mixed methods study uses relational bureaucracy and other theories in a quantitative analysis of state education data to hypothesize that students who are children of recent immigrants are less likely to be served by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and less likely to be served in inclusive settings. A companion case study of a public elementary school uses ecological and relational bureaucracy theory to examine public policy and organizational influences on the ability of school staff to respond to students experiencing academic or social difficulties when they are also children of recent immigrants with low income.

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Friday, November 11 (10:00-11:30 ET)

Coordinating Complex Construction Projects - A Relational Approach (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: John Paul Stephens (Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Joyce Fletcher (Professor, Simmons College)

Across the globe, participating in construction projects can be typically characterized by two themes. First, the construction of complex buildings involves interdependent work with high levels of uncertainty in tight timeframes. Second, individual stakeholders in construction projects (e.g. different trades organizations, the construction management company, owner/client, architect, engineers, etc.) often act in self-interested ways, with little communication about problems, leading to poor quality buildings, budget and schedule overruns, and damaged relationships. Our mixed methods case study of the construction of a large healthcare building describes how a major healthcare provider practices a self-designed project delivery system that incentivizes collaboration and problem-solving, and uses various relational mechanisms to enable relational coordination. In this presentation we will present preliminary results from qualitative interviews, archival data, and relational coordination surveys to explain how multiple groups, working together in a large, complex, temporary project, act as a unit in the face of uncertainty, competing interests, and complexity. While employing action research and drawing on the healthcare institution's self-reflexive approach to how it structures and supports relationships like other research, this study is one of the first to examine relational coordination in the construction industry and to focus on relational coordination in temporary project-based relationships.

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Friday, December 16 (10:00-11:30 ET)

Relational Coordination and Cross-Selling in Chinese Retail Chain - The Role of Human Resource Management (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Helen Liu (Associate Professor, Pennsylvania State University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Stephen Procter (Professor, Newcastle University)

Abstract: In the face of intensified market competition, companies are seeking innovative ways to increase sales effectiveness through proactively expanding customers’ existing purchase portfolios within the same service encounter. While many companies have chosen to invest in technological infrastructure such as IT-based communication systems and customer analytics databases as an effort to identify and capture sales opportunities, many have largely overlooked the crucial roles of frontline service employees in predicting and optimizing sales, who regularly engage in emergent and spontaneous interactions with customers. In a retail environment, customers often are not adequately aware of the offerings of related products, and they sometimes cannot clearly articulate their purchase needs. In these situations, a successful transaction not only requires service employees to have the motivation and skills to provide expert recommendations on the products that they specialize, but also the ability to integrate and reconfigure information and resources from other product teams to bundle up and best accommodate customers’ needs. To explore the role of relational human resource (HR) practices in driving cross-selling outcomes, the authors are conducting a multi-phase, multi-source study based on a sample of retail stores in China. Preliminary results will be presented in light of the in-progress status of this study. Overall, the webinar will discuss how the relational coordination perspective can improve the current understanding of performance-enhancing HR systems.

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Spring 2016 Research Webinars (completed)

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Friday, January 15 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Using Congruence and Relational Coordination Theories to Elicit Change in Baltimore City Public Schools (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Sana Naeem (PhD Student, Brandeis University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Anne Douglass (Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Boston)

Organizationally, Baltimore City Public Schools are plagued with competing social, institutional, and challenges, particularly at the high school level. School administrators do not have the resources and support to mitigate these problems, promulgating a culture of low expectations among the students and faculty. In east Baltimore, Heritage High School was characterized as a failing school before its closure in May 2014. The congruence model, relational coordination theory, and social capital theory are theoretical models that enable us to explore the reasons Heritage High School was once considered failing. After establishing the relevance of these theories, an intervention research design will be developed and analyzed. While limitations of the research design exist, the proposed empirical study aims to increase the achievement and morale of both Baltimore high school students and faculty.

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Friday, February 12 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Improving Relational Coordination in Community Based Care Through Multi-disciplinary Meetings - A Clustered Randomized Control Trial (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Vera Scholmerich (Professor, Erasmus University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Kenneth Milne (Physician Leader, Founder, Salus Global Consulting)

We investigated whether an intervention facilitating multidisciplinary meetings between community midwives and obstetric caregivers led to higher ratings of relational coordination between these groups.   Using a clustered randomized control-trial design, the Netherlands was divided into 62 municipalities, and we selected 10 municipalities with socio-demographic parameters associated with high risk for adverse birth outcomes:  5 municipalities were randomly assigned as the intervention group, and 5 municipalities served as the control group. After a 12-month intervention, the intervention group was found to have significantly higher RC scores between community midwives and obstetric caregivers, relative to the control group. 

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Friday, March 11  (11:00-12:30 ET)

Speaking the Same Professional Language: Associations with Relational Coordination and Perceived Quality of Care in Swiss Rehabilitation  (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Manuel Stuhlinger, Gudela Grote, Jan Schmutz (ETH Zurich)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Timothy Vogus (Professor, Vanderbilt University)

In an interdisciplinary medical team, coordination among its members is indispensable for good care. In our study, we examine if a shared language in rehabilitation care teams positively relates to perceived quality of care and job satisfaction.  We propose a serial mediation model, with relational coordination and psychological safety to serially mediate said relationships. In a cross-sectional study, we surveyed 208 healthcare workers in three different Swiss rehabilitation centers. Analyses of the model using a regression-based path analytic framework support the hypothesized relationships, providing first evidence that shared language is associated with perceived quality of care and job satisfaction, and that relational coordination and psychological safety act as serial mechanisms to mediate its impact on these outcomes.

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Friday, April 15 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Building the Ties that Bind: Hub Firms and Relational Capacity in Cross-Organizational Networks (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Anna Perlmutter (PhD Student, Case Western Reserve University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Benjamin Gomes-Casseres (Professor, Brandeis International Business School)

Central “hub” firm organizations play an integral role in building relational capacity in cross-organizational systems towards collective outcomes (Ostrom, 1999; Bardach, 2001; Hocevar et al., 2006). Using the context of management support organizations (MSOs), I explore the emergence of this relational capacity by reimagining the act of giving and receiving organizational support as an important coordinating relationship, driven by hubs orchestrating new connections, channels of communication, knowledge creation, and shared resources for network members. Guided by new Institutional theory, Stakeholder theory, and Relational Coordination theory approaches, the hub firm is presented here as a unique boundary-spanning entity whose mission drives these coordinating relationships characterized by shared goals, shared values, and mutual respect across multiple levels of analysis (Gittell & Weiss, 2004; Bond & Gittell, 2010). Through this lens, cross-organizational coordination, characterized by the relational capacity of participants, is defined as a new institutional form, ready for further exploration.

Relational capacity, or Collaborative Capacity as it is examined here, is treated as both an outcome (Ahuja, 2000; Weber, Lovrich, & Gaffney, 2007) as well as a driving force (Hocevar et al. 2006; Weinberg et. al., 2011) of positive coordinating relationships. Within this model, the hub support firm serves a bridging and bonding purpose for network participants (Burt, 1997), depending on the level of Collaborative Capacity and Relational Coordination present. The theoretical discussion is accompanied by propositions that capture the process by which cross-organizational coordination improves and is improved by greater relational and Collaborative Capacity, facilitated by a central coordinating firm within the network. Within this theoretical framework, the increased social capital brokered by the organizational hub deepens trust-based network relationships resulting in stronger partnerships, positive organizational outcomes, and greater organizational wellbeing across the network (Mulroy & Shay, 1998; Foster-Fishman et al., 2001). Implications for future qualitative and quantitative research are discussed, addressing coordination at multiple levels of analysis as well as the role of emerging organizational-level orchestrators in coordinating network-based support systems.

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Friday, May 13 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Shaping Systems to Promote Desired Outcomes: Interprofessional Collaborative Practice in Rural North Carolina EDs (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Donna Sullivan Havens (Professor, UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Frannie Shechter Raede (Doctoral Student, Brandeis University)

Interprofessional collaborative practice is linked with positive outcomes for the patient experience, population health and costs; however, little is known about how to make it happen and how to make it stick. We will implement a 4 hospital learning collaborative to promote nursing’s capacity to lead and practice in the interprofessional environment of the emergency department – a setting “in crisis” and “at the breaking point” due to fragmentation of care, leading to delays, errors, and staff shortages (IOM, 2006). More notably, EDs are where in many rural areas, vulnerable populations go for all their care.  

The project will be guided by Positive Organizational Scholarship frameworks such as Relational Coordination and Appreciative Inquiry. We will simultaneously implement and evaluate the model in 4 diverse sites, enabling rich comparisons of implementation and informing replication. Nurse-led teams including patients/families will learn “about, from, and with each other” to collaboratively design care that will improve patient/family and clinician outcomes. Nurse leaders, emerging nurse leaders and nursing students will be integrated into project activities to prepare a collaborative practice-ready nurse workforce.  Interactive activities (e.g., simulation) will be used to build interprofessional competencies. Patient/family co-design of relational, structural, and work process interventions will give them “voice” to collaborate with health professionals to create the “excellent ED patient experience.”  Because the ED is a microcosm of the hospital, situating the project in the ED provides great reach, enhancing potential for project spread to multiple areas, professionals, and services, promoting replication.

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Friday, June 17 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Testing an RC Intervention to Affect Organizational Change Across a Youth Violence Collaborative (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Brenda Bond (Professor, Suffolk University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Lauren Hajjar (Adjunt Faculty and Senior Fellow, Suffolk University)

The Comprehensive Gang Model (CGM) is a nationally recognized practice to reduce gang and youth violence. The CGM is a structure through which communities can organize their gang and youth violence reduction approach. Despite its promising dimensions, barriers to goal achievement have most often been attributed to Inter- and intra-organizational challenges of collaboration, leadership, and data. Research has shown that when violence prevention initiatives fail, it is most often due to  lack of organizational change, not necessarily due to the specific interventions that were employed.

This presentation discusses a quasi-experimental design in which two urban communities were selected to receive the organizational change intervention (treatment) and two similar sites serve as comparison sites, to best understand changes that occur as a result of the organizational change intervention. We rely on the theory of relational coordination (RC) as a mechanism through which collaborators can affect inter- and intra-organizational change. RC is well suited for this study as the theory helps us understand and influence how groups collaborate to accomplish outcomes of interest. Our work focuses on the organizational change dimensions of the CGM to better understand if organizational change-targeted guidance via RC affects change in CGM and community goals.  Professor Bond will review the study design and methods and speak to the early intervention and measurement activities undertaken since the study began in January.

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Fall 2015 Research Webinars (completed)

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Friday, November 20 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Investigating RC Dynamics in a Social Movement Building Alliance Context

Presenter: Callie Watkins Liu (PhD Candidate, Brandeis University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Eric Jones (Research Professor, University of Texas, Houston)

This dissertation investigates how the internal dynamics of a social movement relate to the short or medium-term outcomes of that social movement. It uses Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality to conduct an exploration and application of a combined Congruence Model/ Relational Coordination Theory organizational model in a social movement building context. This webinar will present preliminary findings, and discuss theoretical, methodological and analytical implications of using RC in this social movement-building context.

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Friday, September 18 (10:30-12 ET)

Integrating Complexity and Relational Coordination Theory to Understand Organizational Change in Surgical Context

Presenter: Caroline Logan (PhD Candidate, Brandeis University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Mary Uhl-Bien (Professor, Texas Christian University)

This presentation will highlight early findings from an ongoing dissertation studying organizational change in an orthopedic surgery department in response to new healthcare financing models. Findings from early qualitative fieldwork on the role of formal leaders and emergent leadership in guiding organizational change in this context will be presented. This study will draw on both complexity theory and relational coordination theory and explore ways to integrate the two. In particular, an aim of this presentation will be to explore how complexity theory and relational coordination theory conceptualize the role of formal leaders and the ways leadership emerges through the interactions among individuals in complex systems.

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Friday, October 23 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Speedy Delivery versus Long-Term Strategy: Knowledge Coordination under Time Pressure between Project Teams and Permanent Departments in Amsterdam Public Works  (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Freek Van Berkel (PhD Candidate, VU Amsterdam)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Professor, RCRC, Brandeis University)

Discussant: Ragnhild Kvalshaugen (Professor, Norwegian Business School)

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Spring 2015 Research Webinars (completed)

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Friday, February 20 (10:00-11:30 ET)

Exploring the Linkages between High Performance Work Systems and Organizational Performance: The Role of Relational Coordination (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Muhammad Siddique (Institute of Management Science, Pakistan)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant:  Xiangmin Liu (Pennsylvania State University)

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Friday, March 13 (1:00-2:30 ET)

Care Coordination: A Relational Systems Approach (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Suhna Lee (Yale University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant: Christine Bishop (Brandeis/Heller School)

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Friday, April 17 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Closing the Quality Gap: Coordination of Chronic Care (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Jessica Mellinger (University of Michigan)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant:  John Carroll (MIT Sloan School)

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Friday, May 29 (12:00-1:30 ET)

Relational Coordination of Workforce Diversity and Firm Performance: The Moderating Impacts of Workgroup Autonomy and Multisource Feedback (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter: Hun Whee Lee (Seoul National University)

Facilitator:  Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant: Michele Williams (Cornell University)

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2014 Research Webinar Schedule (completed)

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Friday, January 31 (11:00-12:30 ET)

In Pursuit of High Performing Health Care Teams:  A Test of TeamSTEPPS as a Mode to Improve Relational Coordination In Ambulatory Care Teams

Presenter:  Dylan Ross (California School of Professional Psychology)

Facilitator: Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant:  Brenda Zierler (University of Washington)

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Friday, April 25 (2:00-3:30 ET)

The Influence of Information Systems Affordances on Work Practices in Health Care:  A Relational Coordination Approach

Presenter: Ina Sebastian (University of Hawaii)

Facilitator: Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant:  Darryl Romanow (Duquesne University)

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Friday, September 19 (11:00-12:30 ET)

Relational Coordination and Collaborative Knowledge Creation (If you are a partner, click the webinar title to view a recording)

Presenter:  Delia Mannen (ESADE Business School)

Facilitator: Jody Hoffer Gittell (Brandeis/RCRC)

Discussant: John Paul Stephens (Case Western Reserve University)

 

Changing the operating system of an organization is an arduous task. When there are multiple professionals, there are multiple perspectives. This diversity often includes 
power differentials. Distribution of power at the point of care allows self-organization and is expected to 
strengthen learning and coordination. Governance is no 
longer the function of a single individual, profession, or hierarchical function, but rather is shared by those doing the work. Evidence based practice councils designed as collaborative 
networks have the potential to foster 
shared governance. 


In this project at Hospital of Valais, I measured organizational readiness for shared governance, implemented a learning session 
to improve capacity for shared governance, created evidence based councils as a form of shared governance, and measured the impact of evidence based councils on reciprocal learning and relational coordination. 
I used a pre- post, quasi-experimental evaluation design. Organizational readiness for 
shared governance was measured via the Index of Professional Governance with an 80% (n=129) response rate.  Paired t- tests were used to assess for post-implementation change on reciprocal learning and relational coordination, 
including the Reciprocal Learning Scale and the Relational Coordination Scale (N=32). 

The results (mean 193.14; SD 40.40) ranked perceived nursing governance at the early stage.
 The overall quality of connections in the evidence based council improved after the learning session. We found a statistically 
significant increase in the reciprocal learning (t= -2.452; p=".027)."  There 
was a trend towards significant increases in relational coordination as well (t= -1.975; p=""
.068), with relational coordination shifting from weak ties to moderate ties.

In the face of intensified market competition, companies are seeking innovative ways to increase sales effectiveness through proactively expanding customers’ existing purchase portfolios within the same service encounter. While many companies have chosen to invest in technological infrastructure such as IT-based communication systems and customer analytics databases as an effort to identify and capture sales opportunities, many have largely overlooked the crucial roles of frontline service employees in predicting and optimizing sales, who regularly engage in emergent and spontaneous interactions with customers. In a retail environment, customers often are not adequately aware of the offerings of related products, and they sometimes cannot clearly articulate their purchase needs. In these situations, a successful transaction not only requires service employees to have the motivation and skills to provide expert recommendations on the products that they specialize, but also the ability to integrate and reconfigure information and resources from other product teams to bundle up and best accommodate customers’ needs. To explore the role of relational human resource (HR) practices in driving cross-selling outcomes, the authors are conducting a multi-phase, multi-source study based on a sample of retail stores in China. Preliminary results will be presented in light of the in-progress status of this study. Overall, the webinar will discuss how the relational coordination perspective can improve the current understanding of performance-enhancing HR systems.
 

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